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TitleDifferential subcellular targeting of glutamate receptor subtypes during homeostatic synaptic plasticity.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsSoares, Cary, Kevin F. H. Lee, Wissam Nassrallah, and Jean-Claude Béïque
JournalJ Neurosci
Volume33
Issue33
Pagination13547-59
Date Published2013 Aug 14
ISSN1529-2401
KeywordsAnimals, Blotting, Western, Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials, Female, Hippocampus, Homeostasis, Male, Neuronal Plasticity, Organ Culture Techniques, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Protein Transport, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, AMPA, Synapses
Abstract

Homeostatic processes are believed to contribute to the stability of neuronal networks that are perpetually influenced by Hebbian forms of synaptic plasticity. Whereas the rules governing the targeting and trafficking of AMPA and NMDA subtypes of glutamate receptors during rapid Hebbian LTP have been extensively studied, those that are operant during homeostatic forms of synaptic strengthening are less well understood. Here, we used biochemical, biophysical, and pharmacological approaches to investigate glutamate receptor regulation during homeostatic synaptic plasticity. We show in rat organotypic hippocampal slices that prolonged network silencing induced a robust surface upregulation of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, not only at synapses, but also at extrasynaptic dendritic and somatic regions of CA1 pyramidal neurons. We also detected a shift in NMDAR subunit composition that, in contrast to the cell-wide surface delivery of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, occurred exclusively at synapses. The subunit composition and subcellular distribution of AMPARs and NMDARs are therefore distinctly regulated during homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Thus, because subunit composition dictates key channel properties, such as agonist affinity, gating kinetics, and calcium permeability, the homeostatic synaptic process transcends the simple modulation of synaptic strength by also regulating the signaling and integrative properties of central synapses.

DOI10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1873-13.2013
Alternate JournalJ. Neurosci.
PubMed ID23946413
Grant List / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada