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TitleNoradrenaline is a stress-associated metaplastic signal at GABA synapses.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsInoue, Wataru, Dinara V. Baimoukhametova, Tamás Füzesi, Jaclyn I. Wamsteek Cusulin, Kathrin Koblinger, Patrick J. Whelan, Quentin J. Pittman, and Jaideep S. Bains
JournalNat Neurosci
Volume16
Issue5
Pagination605-12
Date Published2013 May
ISSN1546-1726
KeywordsAnimals, Animals, Newborn, Chelating Agents, Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases, Disease Models, Animal, Enzyme Inhibitors, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Hypothalamus, In Vitro Techniques, Inhibitory Postsynaptic Potentials, Light, Luminescent Proteins, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Neuronal Plasticity, Neurotransmitter Agents, Norepinephrine, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Signal Transduction, Stress, Psychological, Synapses
Abstract

Exposure to a stressor sensitizes behavioral and hormonal responses to future stressors. Stress-associated release of noradrenaline enhances the capacity of central synapses to show plasticity (metaplasticity). We found noradrenaline-dependent metaplasticity at GABA synapses in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus in rat and mouse that controls the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In vivo stress exposure was required for these synapses to undergo activity-dependent long-term potentiation (LTPGABA). The activation of β-adrenergic receptors during stress functionally upregulated metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1), allowing for mGluR1-dependent LTPGABA during afferent bursts. LTPGABA was expressed postsynaptically and manifested as the emergence of new functional synapses. Our findings provide, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration that noradrenaline release during an in vivo challenge alters information storage capacity at GABA synapses. Because these GABA synapses become excitatory following acute stress, this metaplasticity may contribute to neuroendocrine sensitization to stress.

DOI10.1038/nn.3373
Alternate JournalNat. Neurosci.
PubMed ID23563580
PubMed Central IDPMC3984240
Grant List86501-2 / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada
/ / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada